Jonathan Bowden, Lancashire BNP meeting, Sept ’09, Pt. 3

Transcript:

He would think that they were persons who needed a wash! And when Alec Douglas-Home, who was regarded as being very “out of touch,” was asked, on the equivalent of Panorama in 1963, “What do you think of the recent rise in unemployment?” He said, raising a stick, “Oh, well there’s room for a new game-keeper on my estate.” That was when the Tories were something different, weren’t they really? He was quite clearly living in another world to most of the people in this country — even in the early 1960s. But can you imagine him being, like Cameron, a member of United Against Fascism?

I saw a few pictures of the Red, White and Blue which happened in Derbyshire a couple of weeks back in this year of United Against Fascism, and it’s very odd. The first thing I noticed about them is a new generation has emerged. The second thing I noticed was that they were very small in number. The third thing I noticed was that they all had red flags massed together in their falsity of numbers and many of those flags had the hammer and sickle on them. The Hammer and Sickle! Yes! We haven’t seen that for a long time have we, you know? And what does that stand for? Militant egalitarianism; the destruction of Western society; the death to everything that this country once stood for; the desecration of what people, basically, fought for in both wars that I mentioned earlier. This is what the sort of communism that these people stand for is about, so when people look at these sorts of sites and listen to this sort of propaganda they ought to remember that this is communist propaganda; that’s it opposed to everything this country’s ever stood for and has been, and can be in the future. These people are totally unrepresentative. As I looked on the internet in a local library I saw various transvestites, and people in bondage gear, and this sort of thing leaping about. I thought I’d put in Liza Minnelli’s Cabaret by mistake, but in actual fact it was United Against Fascism down in Derbyshire — the police looking tight-lipped, you know, as they sort of danced around them. And interestingly, there’s the odd, sort of quite believing Muslim in the crowd — not many but there were a few. What they make of these sorts of shenanigans about which their religion is extra-ordinarily Right-wing and intolerant, one doesn’t know. They probably compartmentalise and say it’s all a sort of delinquent Western fun-fair that they’re just observing from one side.

But the truth of the matter is that — to be serious for a moment — we have a mass recession, we have mass unemployment, and where is the Left? Where is the Left? The Left that represents the working man; the Left that represents the British working-class; the Left that represents the international proletariat inside Britain. In the ’30s they were in the streets! They were in the unions! They were thinking about how they could take power in the society! Every time you had an economic dip in the early ’90s, to a degree, in the early ’80s under Thatcher… Remember the Right to Work marches? “Right to Work!” Many of the people in those marches had never done a day’s work in their lives, but they wanted the right to work, and they could mass tens of thousands in the streets! Where are they now? They’re finished! The Left has gone from history. The Soviet Union was an utter disaster. A genocidal disaster. Nobody — even radicals who’re anti-system in the West — wants to touch them now. The only way in which they can be radical is to oppose us, because the next twenty to fifty years will see the rise of the Right in various forms all over the world in all groups.

What we have to make sure is that the Right that comes up in our society represents us, and our values and our traditions. Because we know who we are; we don’t need laws to describe who we are; we don’t need little a priori prejudicial statements which prevent us from saying what we are. We know who we are! Kipling once said, “the English, deep down, know who they are. Only the English know.” We know what we are, we know what we’ve been capable of, we know what we can do again. Nearly all our people agree with us in a subtle way but they’re afraid. They’re afraid; their establishment has betrayed them and they wonder what to do. They feel helpless and bereft. An organisation like this has to lift people up, it has to give them strength and hope in their hearts. This country can be changed. Only the democratic ballot box can do it. The next census will reveal that the country’s only eighty percent indigenous now, but many of the people who’ve come in can go out economically just as quickly as they arrived. Things are going to change in the next twenty-five to fifty years very radically: ecological damage, economic stress, the collapse of versions of capitalism without the Left as an alternative. We’re going to see benefits cut in the next couple of years. We’re going to see the “easy years” (if they were easy — and they weren’t for many) in the ’60s and ’70s go. The idea that there are jobs to be had is going! There’s two hundred applying for every McDonald’s job now. That’s a job paying five sixty-five an hour to flip over an American burger that makes you obese and die horribly before you’re sixty — and two hundred are applying for each of those jobs (and probably about a quarter of them aren’t European).

So there’s, underneath the surface of Sky News and Happy Clappy and Amy Winehouse snorting drugs — underneath the surface of that — there’s a great tension in this society. And there’s a great sense of foreboding. Deep polling by the B.B.C. thinks that many people are deeply worried. Worried that’s there’s going to be conflict in this culture; worried that there’s no-one to lead them; worried about the collapse of our identity in various forms — and we are in considerable collapse. You have to go round many of our cities: you notice the decay in the infrastructure, you notice the amount of blatant criminality — where are the police? Do you see the police as they drive around in their cars and they fly over cities in their numbered helicopters? They’re all dressed in yellow now so you can see them from a distance, but they’re firemen! They come at the end! They come after it’s kicked-off, they get out of the wagon when people are lying on the ground; they come at the end, not at the beginning. There just to put it out and dampen it down. They see their remit as partly inter-community tension rather than solving crime and dealing with some of the gangs that I’ve talked about proliferating inner Birmingham and elsewhere. So this country’s in trouble. And Cameron has no solutions at all. He will cut public expenditure, and because they don’t like spending money, the Tories will be a little bit more honest about that. But they will invest in wars like the coming war that might occur over Iran, and the one that’s already petering out into oblivion and defeat like the one in the ’80s and ’90s in Afghanistan. He says he’s against the European Union, but will you have a vote on any of these treaties?

At the last election Brown said he would give us a vote on that constitution and he’s completely renaid! So yet another lie from the man that said he was straight. Do you remember when he came in? He said, “Look at me,” he said, “I’m Gordon Brown, and I…” — you know the way he speaks? — “…and I’m going to be sincere with you.” with his head on one side. Every time I see Gordon Brown he looks older. One eye’s up here, one eye’s down here, the hair gets whiter and greyer, the chins get more pulled to the left. He looks sadder and more alone, doesn’t he? Every time you see him you know he’s a man in decline.

New Labour has had it! Old Labour died before ’97, and New Labour’s now in the dustbin. New Labour’s probably as hated now as Major was in ’97. But our people have got to stop moaning, and switching from group to group, and hoping that somebody new and cheesy (like Blair back ten years) will sort it out for them. They’ve got to choose something new. They’ve got to choose something radical. They’ve got to cease being afraid. You say to people, “Will you vote for this party over there?” and they say, “Oh no, no… they’re extreme. I didn’t like what I read about them in The Daily Mirror. I didn’t like this remark that this chap made about historical events that are sixty years old. I’m worried, I’m worried, I want to sit on the toilet…” you know? A lot of our people unfortunately are like this. The spirit of the egg frying on the North African tank in the eighth army in the early ’40s has unfortunately receded a bit. But deep down, it’s because the English and the British have been betrayed. They’ve always wanted to moan a bit, but otherwise trust their leaders, and they’ve realised now they can’t trust their leaders.

If this country’s to have any future, and we are not to slide into the second and then into the third world over this century, we have a choice to make. And we have to provide a new ruling group drawn from the body of the population — people who don’t just get into parliament to cheat on expenses the first day they’re in there. Because they’ve been cheating with those expenses for thirty to fifty years. Thatcher introduced those changes about twenty-five, to twenty-seven, to thirty years ago. When Michæl Foot was asked about pay — remember Michæl Foot? Duffie-coated at the cenetar picking his nose, that sort of thing. But when Foot was in, and Labour politicians said, “I need a bigger salary.” he said, “Oh don’t bother about that, just claim it on expenses!” So they doubled-up their pay on the expenses. And in comparison to the cheating over money that goes on in the City of London, that parliamentary cheating is actually small beer. It’s their resentment over that, and those sorts of things, that leads them to behave in that way.

So there’s a total disconnect now, between the ruling group and the masses. And the masses have got to search for some stomach for once, and they’ve got to be prepared to vote for radical people who’ll clear out New Labour — clear them out.

Part 2 > Part 4

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Adam

As a man among men, I can learn.

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